8 foods you absolutely must weigh!

Emma Brown | 02 Sep, 2018

Here are the 8 foods you MUST measure or suffer the consequences!


1 Oil



A tablespoon has a whopping 123 calories. Drizzling straight into the pan often leads to a huge overuse (we're looking at your Jamie O!).

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2 Nuts



While certainly healthy, thanks to their levels of good fat, nuts are very high in calories. Grabbing a handful can be dangerous, so be sure to always weigh - 30g is a portion.

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3 Mayonnaise



Full fat versions have an impressive 100 calories per 15g serving, but a generous spoonful from the jar is likely be a more, so a measuring spoon is strongly advised.

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4 Cheese



It's incredibly easy to cut a hefty chunk of cheddar and eat it without realising. At 125 calories for a small 30g match box sized piece, it's essential to weigh. Grating cheese makes it go further.

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5 Nut butters



Crunchy versions are extremely difficult to spread thinly. Smooth butters are easier, but don't assume it's only a 'thin' scraping. At almost 100 calories per 15g serving it's important to know exactly how much you've used.

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6 Cereal



30-40g serving is the recommended serving size for most cereals. We did an experiment that found most people pour almost double this. Always weigh your cereals, we're certain you'll be shocked!

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7 Butter



It's essentially 100% fat, so understandly it's high in calories. A little 7g butter pack contains a generous 52 calories – and butter straight from the fridge is impossible to spread thinly. Always weigh your serving and stay in the know.

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8 Jacket potato



Your visual idea of what a 'medium' potato is, is probably somewhat bigger than the 213g definition of 'medium'. Always weigh your potatoes before cooking and record the weight for accuracy.

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Nutritionist Emma Brown, MSc Human Nutrition is passionate about how food science applies to the human body, and how the nutrients in what we eat affect us and ultimately have an impact on our health.